Sanauli Chariot Find 4000 Years Harappan Horse


The self-styled historians of India seem to a single mission in their life.

However erudite these historians are,which is an epbithet they seem to describe themselves,their dishonesty shows when the come to interpret facts relating to Indian history.

This is not limited to denying the statements made in ancient Indian texts including the Vedas and Puranas.

Despite the facts that,

Ramayana is dated around 5114 CE,

Mahabharata has thirty nine archeological sites which proves the Mahabharatathe,

One Million old Advanced Tamil site being found near Chennai,Tamil Nadu,India,

Poompuhar, Tamil Nadu is dated about twenty thousand years ago,

Tamil sites in Arikkamedu,Adichanallur are dated about 5000 Years old,

Oldest Murugan temple in Pondicherry is dated around 4000 BC,

Dwaraka is dated Thirty thousand years old…

these Scholars go on denying the dates assigned to Sites relating to Indian history!

As if this is not enough,they bring in new theories like the Aryan Invasion theory of India.

This theory is discredited now.

However these doyens take another argument that based on the Horse.

Their contention is that the Horses were brought in by the invading Aryans to India.

( However,they are forced to assign 5000 CE to Rig Veda as they could not prove it to be otherwise)

Also that Horses were not found in Harappa.

Now let me refute.

1. There are Vedic References to the horses.

The Rig Veda reference to Horse.

1. SLIGHT us not Varuṇa, Aryaman, or Mitra, Ṛbhukṣan, Indra, Āyu, or the Maruts,
When we declare amid the congregation the virtues of the strong Steed, God-descended.
2 What time they bear before the Courser, covered with trappings and with wealth, the grasped oblation,
The dappled goat goeth straightforward, bleating, to the place dear to Indra and to Pūṣan.
3 Dear to all Gods, this goat, the share of Pūṣan, is first led forward with the vigorous Courser,
While Tvaṣṭar sends him forward with the Charger, acceptable for sacrifice, to glory.
4 When thrice the men lead round the Steed, in order, who goeth to the Gods as meet oblation,
The goat precedeth him, the share of Pūṣan, and to the Gods the sacrifice announceth.
5 Invoker, ministering priest, atoner, fire-kindler Soma-presser, sage, reciter,
With this well ordered sacrifice, well finished, do ye fill full the channels of the rivers.
6 The hewers of the post and those who carry it, and those who carve the knob to deck the Horse’s stake;
Those who prepare the cooking-vessels for the Steed,—may the approving help of these promote our work.
7 Forth, for the regions of the Gods, the Charger with his smooth back is come my prayer attends him.
In him rejoice the singers and the sages. A good friend have we won for the Gods’ banquet.
8 May the fleet Courser’s halter and his heel-ropes, the head-stall and the girths and cords about him.
And the grass put within his mouth to bait him,—among the Gods, too, let all these be with thee.
9 What part of the Steed’s flesh the fly hath eaten, or is left sticking to the post or hatchet,
Or to the slayer’s hands and nails adhereth,—among the Gods, too, may all this be with thee.
10 Food undigested steaming from his belly, and any odour of raw flesh remaining,
This let the immolators set in order and dress the sacrifice with perfect cooking.
11 What from thy body which with fire is roasted, when thou art set upon the spit, distilleth,
Let not that lie on earth or grass neglected, but to the longing Gods let all be offered.
12 They who observing that the Horse is ready call out and say, the smell is good; remove it;
And, craving meat, await the distribution,—may their approving help promote labour.
13 The trial-fork of the flesh-cooking caldron, the vessels out of which the broth is sprinkled,
The warming-pots, the covers of the dishes, hooks, carving-boards,—all these attend the Charger.
14 The starting-place, his place of rest and rolling, the ropes wherewith the Charger’s feet were fastened,
The water that he drank, the food he tasted,—among the Gods, too, may all these attend thee.
15 Let not the fire, smoke-scented, make thee crackle, nor glowing caldron smell and break to pieces.
Offered, beloved, approved, and consecrated,—such Charger do the Gods accept with favour.
16 The robe they spread upon the Horse to clothe him, the upper covering and the golden trappings,
The halters which restrain the Steed, the heel-ropes,—all these, as grateful to the Gods, they offer.
17 If one, when seated, with excessive urging hath with his heel or with his whip distressed thee,
All these thy woes, as with the oblations’ ladle at sacrifices, with my prayer I banish.
18 The four-and-thirty ribs of the. Swift Charger, kin to the Gods, the slayer’s hatchet pierces.
Cut ye with skill, so that the parts be flawless, and piece by piece declaring them dissect them.
19 Of Tvaṣṭar’s Charger there is one dissector,—this is the custom-two there are who guide him.
Such of his limbs as I divide in order, these, amid the balls, in fire I offer.
20 Let not thy dear soul burn thee as thou comest, let not the hatchet linger in thy body.
Let not a greedy clumsy immolator, missing the joints, mangle thy limbs unduly.
21 No, here thou diest not, thou art not injured: by easy paths unto the Gods thou goest.
Both Bays, both spotted mares are now thy fellows, and to the ass’s pole is yoked the Charger.
22 May this Steed bring us all-sustaining riches, wealth in good kine, good horses, manly offspring.
Freedom from sin may Aditi vouchsafe us: the Steed with our oblations gain us lordship!

Rig Veda Book 1. Chaoter XLXII

Source. Ralph Griffith’s translation of the Rig Veda.

http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/rigveda/rv01162.htm

2. Horses are mentioned repeatedly in the Vedas,Puranas referring to them while talking about the Aswamedha yaga,the Horse sacrifice.

3. These ancient texts and ancient Tamil Texts speak of the four types armies.

Ratha,Chariot,

Gaja, Elephants,

Thuraka,Horse and

Soldiers.

Nowhere in the ancient history of the world you would hear about all these being used at the same time.

4.The Ashwin kumara Twins referred to in the Purana,they are referred to as Celestial physicians

5.Hayagreeva God of Wisdom,was cloned with Human and has the face of a Horse.

6. The kings of ancient kingdoms had teaching syllabus for Hirse riding.

7. Charioteering was a specific profession and people were trained.

Sumandhira was the Charioteer of Dasaratha,Father of Lord Rama

Lord Krishna was the Charioteer of Arjuna during the Mahabharatha War.

Salliya was the Charioteer of Karna,during the same War.

Karna was brought up by a Charioteer.

I can keep on adding references.

Yet, Scholars refuse to take these as ,in their opinion,are only legends and are referred in texts only!

What do they expect?

Horses and Chariots used in those ancient days remains standing as proof!

Yet, these same people would accept texts as source for the history of the West.

Now additional evidence on the use of Chariot has been found in a\nn ancient site in India.

The self styled Indologists now say that they are Chariots but they need not have been used with Horses!

Recent discovery of three ‘pre-Iron Age’ carriers in Western Uttar Pradesh has excited the world of ancient history. But equally interesting would be the result of a search: were they horse-ridden?

A week has passed since the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) claimed to have stumbled upon three pre-Iron Age chariots that can challenge the famed Aryan invasion theory, lending sharper focus on to whether it were horses or bulls that pulled these carriers estimated to be from 2000-1800 BC.

The copper remains of the chariots, found inside burial pits in a quiet spot along the Gangetic plains in present-day Western Uttar Pradesh’s Baghpat district, date further back to the Bronze Age. That would mean an antiquity of 4,000 years—and a possible hint at their similarities of what existed during the civilisation in faraway Mesopotamia in Western Asia, according to ASI officials.

The latest round of a three-month-long excavation in Sanauli, 75 km west of Delhi, began in March this year, and has unearthed eight burial remains as well. Out of these, three are coffins, archaeologists reveal. All the burials have pottery kept around the body: big pots near the legs and small bowls close to the head—indicating their lying in northwest direction, reveals Dr Sanjay Kumar Manjul, director of the ASI’s Institute of Archaeology, in charge of the excavation.( https://www.outlookindia.com/website/story/asi-excavated-sanauli-chariots-have-potential-to-challenge-aryan-invasion-theory/312415

)

More information on Harappan Horse and rebuttal of Indologists (?)

Physical remains of the horse in Indus-Sarasvati sites

Our first surprise is that contrary to conventional assertions, quite a few archaeologists have reported horse remains from India’s prehistoric sites. A. Ghosh’s respected and authoritative Encyclopaedia of Indian Archaeology mentions without fuss:

In India the … true horse is reported from the Neolithic levels at Kodekal [dist. Gulbarga of Karnataka] and Hallur [dist. Raichur of Karnataka] and the late Harappa levels at Mohenjo-daro (Sewell and Guha, 1931) and Ropar and at Harappa, Lothal and numerous other sites. … Recently bones of Equus caballus have also been reported from the proto-Harappa site of
Malvan in Gujarat.1

Mortimer Wheeler, a flamboyant proponent of the Aryan invasion theory if ever there was one, admitted long ago that “it is likely enough that camel, horse and ass were in fact a familiar feature of the Indus caravan.”2 The well- known archaeologist B. B. Lal refers to a number of horse teeth and bones reported from Kalibangan, Ropar, Malvan and Lothal.3 Another senior archaeologist, S. P. Gupta, adds further details on those finds, including early ones.4 In the case of Lothal, the archaeozoologist Bhola Nath certified the identification of a tooth;5 he also made similar observations regarding bones from Mohenjo-daro and Harappa.6

Harappa horse

Remains of Horse,Harappa.

Horse remains,Harappa.

A. K. Sharma’s well-known identification of horse remains (Fig. 1) at Surkotada (in Katchchh) was endorsed by the late Hungarian archaeozoologist Sándor Bökönyi, an internationally respected authority in the field; in 1991, taking care to distinguish them from those of the local wild ass (khur), he confirmed several of them to be “remnants of true horses,”7 and what is more, domesticated horses. In his 1993 report to the Director-General of the Archaeological Survey of India, Bökönyi made no bones about the whole issue:

Through a thorough study of the equid remains of the prehistoric settlement of Surkotada, Kutch, excavated under the direction of Dr. J. P. Joshi, I can state the following: The occurrence of true horse (Equus caballus L.) was evidenced by the enamel pattern of the upper and lower cheek and teeth and by the size and form of incisors and phalanges (toe bones). Since no wild horses lived in India in post-Pleistocene times, the domestic nature of the Surkotada horses is undoubtful. This is also supported by an inter- maxilla fragment whose incisor tooth shows clear signs of crib biting, a bad habit only existing among domestic horses which are not extensively used for war.8

Quite in tune with the findings at Surkotada and Lothal, P. K. Thomas, P. P. Joglekar et al., experts from the Deccan College on faunal remains, reported horse bones from the nearby Harappan site of Shikarpur “in the Mature Harappan period,”9 and from Kuntasi (at the boundary between Kutch and Saurashtra).10

To the Neolithic sites mentioned by A. Ghosh, we must add Koldihwa (in the Belan valley of Allahabad district), where G. R. Sharma et al. identified horse fossils.11 Contemporary with the Harappan period, the culture of the Chambal valley (in Madhya Pradesh) was explored by the respected archaeologist M. K. Dhavalikar, with layers dated between 2450 and 2000 BCE.
His observations are remarkable:

The most interesting is the discovery of bones of horse from the Kayatha levels and a terracotta figurine of a mare. It is the domesticate species (Equus caballus), which takes back the antiquity of the steed in India to the latter half of the third millennium BC. The presence of horse at Kayatha in all the chalcolithic levels assumes great significance in the light of the controversy about the horse.12

Let us stress that just as at Surkotada, the horse at Kayatha was domesticated.

In the face of so many reports from so many sites by so many experts, a blanket denial of the animal’s physical presence in pre-1500 BCE India passes one’s comprehension. Are we to believe that all identifications of horse remains by experts are wrong and misleading? Have scholars rejecting such evidence personally crosschecked even 10% of it? Have they, too, expressed similar doubts about the identification of other animal remains found in the same sites and conditions?

Richard Meadow and Ajita Patel did challenge Sándor Bökönyi’s report to the Archaeological Survey.13 Bökönyi however stuck to his views (although he passed away before he could give his final response), and Meadow and Patel concluded their long plea with the rather weak statement that “… in the end that [Bökönyi’s identification of horse remains at Surkotada] may be a matter of emphasis and opinion.”14 What makes their eagerness to convince Bökönyi to change his mind suspect is that they never challenged Indian experts such as A. K. Sharma, P. K. Thomas or P. P. Joglekar; it was only when Bökönyi endorsed findings on the “Harappan horse” that they got alarmed. Since then, amusingly, their inconclusive paper has been quoted by several Marxist15 historians as the last word on the nonexistence of the horse in the Indus- Sarasvati civilization.16 Even more ironically, when invasionists attempt to trace the introduction of the horse into Europe, they turn to the same Bökönyi!17 His expertise was never in question in Europe, but is unacceptable in India.

The old argument that so-called horse remains invariably belong to species of wild ass such as the onager (Equus hemionus onager), the khur (Equus hemionus khur), or the plain ass (Equus asinus) is unacceptable, firstly because it is sweeping in nature and produces little or no evidence, secondly because in several cases, experts have simultaneously reported remains of the wild ass from the very same sites, which implies some ability to distinguish between those species.18

Depictions of the horse and the spoked wheel

The Harappans certainly built much of their religious symbols around animals, depicting many of them on their seals and tablets, in terracotta figurines, or as pottery motifs. While it is true that the horse does not appear on the Harappan seals (except if we were to accept the conjecture by S. R. Rao26 and a few other scholars that the composite animal represented on thousands of seals as a unicorn actually has a horse’s head), it has been hastily claimed that the animal is never depicted at all.

A horse figurine did emerge at Mohenjo-daro (Fig. 2), which drew the following comment from E. J. H. Mackay, one of the early excavators at the site:

Perhaps the most interesting of the model animals is one that I personally take to represent a horse. I do not think we need be particularly surprised if it should be proved that the horse existed thus early at Mohenjo-daro.27

Horse,Harappa, Archeological Site.

Remains of Horse,Harappa.

Horse in Mohenjo-Daro.

Horse remains are found in Lothal also.

For more check the Link.

Source.
Published in the Journal of Indian History and Culture of the C. P. Ramaswami Aiyar Institute of Indological Research, Chennai, September 2006, No.13, pp. 33-59.

http://www.archaeologyonline.net/artifacts/horse-debate



Categories: Hinduism

Tags: , , , , , ,

2 replies

  1. Nice information provided by you on Harrapan and Indus valley civilization, and plus your blogs contain some detailed presentation of the ancient history with the inclusion of Hindu gods. Really appreciable

    Like

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