US

Guantanamo Inmate Story Mohamedou Ould Slahi

The interrogation and torture Technics in Guantanamo Prison is we all know. This is one of the many facilities where terrorist suspects are held by the US. US has more facilities abroad including UK,Poland(please read my blog on this) The facilities are inhuman and the Technics are horrible. One can see the brutality in Zero Dark Thirty, a Film(I have a post on this, a Review) Now the interrogation and technics are declassified and Slate is publishing the document by an inmate, Mohamedou Ould Slahi.

The interrogation  and torture Technics  in Guantanamo Prison we all know.

This is one of the many facilities where terrorist suspects are held by the US.

US has more facilities abroad including UK,Poland(please read my blog on this)

The facilities are inhuman and the Technics are horrible.

One can see the brutality in Zero Dark Thirty, a Film(I have a post on this, a Review)

Now the interrogation and technics are declassified and Slate is publishing the document by an inmate, Mohamedou Ould Slahi.

This file photo shows an unnamed detainee in Guantánamo Bay in 2009 Photo by John Moore/Getty Images
This file photo shows an unnamed detainee in Guantánamo Bay in 2009 Photo by John Moore/Getty Images

The Story:

Mohamedou Ould Slahi began to tell his story in 2005. Over the course of several months, the Guantánamo prisoner handwrote his memoir, recounting what he calls his “endless world tour” of detention and interrogation. He wrote in English, a language he mastered in prison. Hishandwriting is relaxed but neat, his narrative, even riddled with redactions, vivid and captivating. In telling his story he tried, as he wrote, “to be as fair as possible to the U.S. government, to my brothers, and to myself.” He finished his 466-page draft in early 2006. For the next six years, the U.S. government held the manuscript as a classified secret…

Mohanedou Ould sahi papers
Mohanedou Ould sahi papers

We’re in the middle of the action. Slahi’s life in captivity had begun eight months earlier, on Nov. 20, 2001, when Slahi, then 30, was summoned by Mauritanian police for questioning. He had just returned home from work; he was in the shower when police arrived. He dressed, grabbed his car keys—he went voluntarily, driving himself to the police station—and told his mother not to worry, he would be home soon.

Slahi wasn’t alarmed because he had been questioned many times:

What followed was one of the most stubborn, deliberate, and cruel Guantánamo interrogations on record. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld personally signed Slahi’s interrogation plan. Like Mohamed al-Qahtani, the Pentagon’s other “Special Project,” Slahi would be subjected to months of 20-hour-a-day interrogations that combined sleep deprivation, severe temperature and diet manipulation, and total isolation with relentless physical and psychological humiliations. He was told his mother had been detained and would soon be at the mercy of the all-male population at Guantánamo. He was threatened with death and subjected to a violent mock rendition. Declassified files, including the Defense Department’s Schmidt-Furlow Report, the Justice Department’s investigation of FBI involvement in Guantánamo interrogations, and the Senate Armed Services Committee’s report on the treatment of detainees, document the Pentagon’s plan and its meticulous and malicious implementation…

We were put in about six or seven big barbed-wire cells, called after the operations performed against the U.S.: “Nairobi,” “U.S.S. Cole,” “Dar es Salaam,” and so on. In each cell there was a detainee called “English,” who benevolently served as an interpreter to translate the orders to his co-detainees. Our “English” was a gentleman from Sudan named [ ? ? ? ? ?]. His English was very basic, thus he asked me secretly whether I spoke English. “No,” I replied. But as it turned out I was a Shakespeare compared to him.

Now I am sitting in front of a bunch of dead-regular U.S. citizens; my first impression, when I saw them chewing without a break: “What’s wrong with these guys, do they have to eat so much?” Most of the guards are tall, and overweight. Some of them were friendly and some very hostile. Whenever I realized that a guard [was hostile], I pretended that I understood no English. I remember one cowboy coming to me with an ugly frown on his face..

Source:

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/foreigners/2013/04/mohamedou_ould_slahi_s_guant_namo_memoirs_how_the_united_states_kept_a_gitmo.html

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