Special Sound Effects By Ancestors, Caves,Temples


The Wisdom of the Ancients leave me stunned.

While we get stuck with developing a few Technologies, our ancestors,be it any civilization, went far ahead of us and developed Technologies that are amazing.

Their creations are still working.

One such Technology is Acoustics.

Through the World are scattered Caves that have excellent tonal and Acoustic properties where the Sound Effect is astonishing , to say the least.

For instance. take the temple complex of Chavín de Huántar in central Peru,  El Castillo pyramid in Mexico.

chavinconch.jpg
Chavin Conch.
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Chavin Tunnels.

‘Waller knew that echoes played a role in many ancient myths, such as Native American tales of sprites who speak through portals in rock walls. In 1994 he conducted an acoustical survey of Horseshoe Canyon, a three-mile-long chasm in southeastern Utah decorated with eerie pictographs. Waller hiked the canyon, pausing at 80 locations to snap a noisemaker fashioned from a rat trap and record the echoes. After processing the results with sound analysis software, he found that five spots displayed powerful echo effects. Four corresponded to the locations of paintings that Waller had encountered. When he asked experts about the fifth, they explained that it, too, bore artwork, though the pictographs were not visible from the path he had followed. Since then, Waller has repeated the experiment at hundreds of rock art sites around the world, almost always finding a correlation between image and echo. He speculates that ancient artists “purposely chose these places because of sound.”….

The most detailed evidence of ancient acoustical design comes from the Stanford team studying Chavín de Huántar, which was constructed between 1300 and 500 B.C. Peruvian archaeologists first suspected the complex had an auditory function in the 1970s, when they found that water rushing through one of its canals mimicked the sound of roaring applause. Then, in 2001, Stanford anthropologist John Rick discovered conch-shell trumpets, called pututus, in one of the galleries. The team set out to determine what role the horns played in ancient rituals and how the temple may have heightened their effects. Archaeoacoustics researcher Miriam Kolar and her collaborators played computer-generated sounds to identify which frequencies the temple most readily transmits. Over years of experiments, they found that certain ducts enhanced the frequencies of the pututus while filtering out others, and that corridors amplified the trumpets’ sound. “It suggests the architectural forms had a special relationship to how sound is transmitted,” Kolar says. The researchers also had volunteers stand in one part of the temple while pututu recordings played in another. In some configurations, the sound seemed to come from all directions.

El Castillo pyramid in Mexico.

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If a person stands at the bottom of the Castillo and shouts, the sound will echo as a shriek that comes from the top of the structure. If someone stands on top and speaks in a normal voice, they can be heard on the ground at a distance of 150 metres away.
At Palenque, also in Mexico, it is apparently the case that if three people stand on top of the three pyramids, a three-way conversation can easily be held.

El Castillo pyramid in Mexico, built by the Mayans some 1,100 years ago, bears four stepped sides, each vertically bisected by a staircase. If you clap your hands at the pyramid’s base, you hear a series of chirps. Locals near similar pyramids have long compared the sound to the cry of the quetzal, a bird venerated by the Mayans. In the 1990s acoustician David Lubman recorded the hand-clap echoes at El Castillo and compared them with recordings of the quetzal. He found that recordings and sonograms of several echoes really do match the bird’s cry. Lubman says the echo “is a powerfully robust phenomenon” unlikely to have resulted by accident.’

http://discovermagazine.com/2012/nov/03-our-ancestors-acoustical-engineers

Now look at some Temples in India which have Acoustic Pillars.

If you tap them at different places, you get the Seven Notes on Indian Classical Music.

‘Musical pillars are famous in this following temples:

1.Alakarkovil,
2.Alvarthirunagari
3.Kalakadu
4.Kuttralam
5.Suseendrum
6.Senpaghanalur
7.Tadpatri.
8.Thadikombu
9.Tirupati
10.Thiruvananthapuram
11.Tirunelveli
(Update: An excellent article about musical pillars can be found at this blog: http://networkedblogs.com/sTYW1)
12.Tenkasi
13.Banglore ramarajanpeattai
14.Madurai Meenakshi
15.Lepakshi
16.Hampi
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